Earthquake

New Zealand sits on the boundary between the Indo-Australian and Pacific tectonic plates, means that we get a large number of earthquakes. 
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Tsunami

A tsunami is a series of sea waves or surges caused by a sudden event (such as earthquakes)  beneath, or near the ocean causing the water column to move and a tsunami ‘wave’ to form.
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We recommend you find your home and workplace, see which (if any) zones they are in, and work out a safe way that you can get (preferably by foot, if possible) out of all the evacuation zones.
Find the tsunami evacuation maps

Storm

New Zealand lies in the path of a strong westerly airflow known as the "roaring forties", producing strong and regular winds across the country.  In the Wellington region the North and South Island mountain ranges funnel winds through the Cook Strait producing the region’s notorious winds.
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Flood

Flooding happens when land is inundated with water. Rivers can flood through high rainfall and urban areas can be flooded from blocked or inadequate drainage.
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Landslide

A landslide is the movement of rock and/or soil, down a slope. Landslides can vary from one or two boulders to massive hillside failures covering many square kilometres. The different types of landslides include rock falls, avalanches, mud flows, debris flow and slope failures.
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Drought

Drought is defined as a prolonged period where rainfall is lower than normal for a particular place.  While variation in rainfall is a normal natural phenomenon, drought becomes a hazard when the effects of the continuing dry period become greater than people who live and work in the area can manage.  
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Pandemic

A pandemic is an infectious disease that spreads across a number of continents or even worldwide. 
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Terrorism

Terrorism is defined as an act that has the intention of inducing terror in the civilian population, or forcing a government or organisation to do, or to abstain from an act. Terrorism acts are often associated with an ideological, political or religious cause.
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Utility failure

Lifeline utilities are the gas, electricity, petrol, transport, water, sewerage and telecommunications infrastructure we need to live. These utilities can be disrupted through event such as earthquakesfires or landslides. Disruptions can also occur through acts of terrorism or accidents that damage infrastructure. 
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Hazardous substance incidents

A hazardous substance is a substance that has one or more ‘hazardous properties’ including explosiveness, flammability, human toxicity, corrosiveness and eco-toxicity, or otherwise causes harm to people or the environment on exposure. It is the hazardous properties of these substances that makes them useful to society but these properties also make the substances potentially dangerous.
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Transport incidents

Wellington’s main transport corridors, both road and rail, are in a Y shape, with few links between the main arterial routes. Several of the roads in the region, particularly the Rimutaka Hill Road (State Highway 2), can be closed during storm events due to the associated high winds, rain or snow.
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Fire

Fire presents a hazard when it is uncontrolled and threatens lives, properties or areas with important natural or cultural significance. 
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Animal and plant pests and diseases

New Zealand’s geographic isolation means that many of our unique indigenous plants and birds are vulnerable to introduced pests and diseases. This isolation also protects our agricultural, forestry and marine industry from some overseas diseases.  
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Volcanic eruption

Volcanic activity happens when hot molten rock rises to the earth’s surface. Most of New Zealand’s volcanic activity is related to the subduction zone to the west of the country. 
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